Preventing Drug Abuse.

  
Preventing Drug Abuse: The Best Strategy

Why is adolescence a critical time for preventing drug addiction?
As noted previously, early use of drugs increases a person’s chances of developing addiction. Remember, drugs change brains—and this can lead to addiction and other serious problems. So, preventing early use of drugs or alcohol may go a long way in reducing these risks. If we can prevent young people from experimenting with drugs, we can prevent drug addiction.
Risk of drug abuse increases greatly during times of transition. For an adult, a divorce or loss of a job may lead to drug abuse; for a teenager, risky times include moving or changing schools.12 In early adolescence, when children advance from elementary through middle school, they face new and challenging social and academic situations. Often during this period, children are exposed to abusable substances such as cigarettes and alcohol for the first time. When they enter high school, teens may encounter greater availability of drugs, drug use by older teens, and social activities where drugs are used.
At the same time, many behaviors that are a normal aspect of their development, such as the desire to try new things or take greater risks, may increase teen tendencies to experiment with drugs. Some teens may give in to the urging of drug-using friends to share the experience with them. Others may think that taking drugs (such as steroids) will improve their appearance or their athletic performance or that abusing substances such as alcohol or MDMA (ecstasy or “Molly”) will ease their anxiety in social situations. A growing number of teens are abusing prescription ADHD stimulants such as Adderall® to help them study or lose weight. Teens’ still-developing judgment and decision-making skills may limit their ability to accurately assess the risks of all of these forms of drug use.

  
Using abusable substances at this age can disrupt brain function in areas critical to motivation, memory, learning, judgment, and behavior control.7 So, it is not surprising that teens who use alcohol and other drugs often have family and social problems, poor academic performance, health-related problems (including mental health), and involvement with the juvenile justice system.
  

For more information on reaching your children before drugs do visit:

Start talking Ohio!

http://starttalking.ohio.gov/Default.aspx?tabid=87

Repost from:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/preventing-drug-abuse-best-strategy

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Talking to your child about gun safety.

  
Talking to your child about gun safety.

Parents play a key role in developing safe practices and are ultimately responsible for the behavior and safety of their children. Isolated lessons and concepts can quickly be forgotten but with repetition, children remember standard safety procedures. The goal of the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® program is to help you bring up an important safety issue with your child. It’s not a complicated or confusing message, and it’s easy and fun to teach. If children see a gun, they need to remember:

 STOP!

This first step is crucial. Stopping first allows your child the time he or she needs to remember the rest of the safety instructions.
  
Don’t Touch

A firearm that is not touched or disturbed is unlikely to fire and otherwise endanger your child or other people.
  
Run Away

This removes the temptation to touch the firearm as well as the danger that another person may negligently cause it to fire.
  
Tell a Grown-up

Children should seek a trustworthy adult, neighbor, relative or teacher – if a parent or guardian is not available.
We encourage you as a responsible parent and citizen to reinforce these ideas by repeating this message and discussing it with your child. According to federal statistics, there are guns in approximately 40% of all U.S. households. Even if you do not have a firearm in your home, chances are that someone you know does. Your child could come in contact with a gun at a neighbor’s house, when playing with friends, or under other circumstances outside of your control. We encourage you as a responsible parent and citizen today to…
Make sure all firearms cannot be reached by anyone who should not have access to them without your consent. Store guns so they are not accessible to unauthorized persons, especially children. 

Keep ammunition securely stored where a child or any other unauthorized person cannot reach it. 

Talk to your child about guns, and gun safety. By removing the mystery surrounding guns, your child will be far less curious about guns, and more likely to follow safety rules. 

Make sure your child understands the difference between a toy gun and a real gun, and the difference between “pretend” and real life. 

In a home where guns are kept, the degree of safety a child has rests squarely on the parents and gun owner. Parents who accept the responsibility to learn, practice and teach gun safety rules will ensure their child’s safety to a much greater extent than those who do not. Parental responsibility does not end, however, when the child leaves the home. That is why it is critical for your child to know what to do if he or she encounters a firearm. The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® program has no agenda other than accident prevention — ensuring that children stay safe should they encounter a gun. 

  
Reposted from:
https://eddieeagle.nra.org/parents

Firearms Safety

  

The fundamental NRA rules for safe gun handling are:

 1. ALWAYS keep the gun pointed in a safe direction.

This is the primary rule of gun safety. A safe direction means that the gun is pointed so that even if it were to go off it would not cause injury or damage. The key to this rule is to control where the muzzle or front end of the barrel is pointed at all times. Common sense dictates the safest direction, depending on different circumstances.

 2. ALWAYS keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot.

When holding a gun, rest your finger on the trigger guard or along the side of the gun. Until you are actually ready to fire, do not touch the trigger.

 3. ALWAYS keep the gun unloaded until ready to use.

Whenever you pick up a gun, immediately engage the safety device if possible, and, if the gun has a magazine, remove it before opening the action and looking into the chamber(s) which should be clear of ammunition. If you do not know how to open the action or inspect the chamber(s), leave the gun alone and get help from someone who does.

When using or storing a gun, always follow these NRA rules:

Know your target and what is beyond.

Be absolutely sure you have identified your target beyond any doubt. Equally important, be aware of the area beyond your target. This means observing your prospective area of fire before you shoot. Never fire in a direction in which there are people or any other potential for mishap. Think first. Shoot second.Know how to use the gun safely.

Before handling a gun, learn how it operates. Know its basic parts, how to safely open and close the action and remove any ammunition from the gun or magazine. Remember, a gun’s mechanical safety device is never foolproof. Nothing can ever replace safe gun handling.Be sure the gun is safe to operate.

Just like other tools, guns need regular maintenance to remain operable. Regular cleaning and proper storage are a part of the gun’s general upkeep. If there is any question concerning a gun’s ability to function, a knowledgeable gunsmith should look at it.Use only the correct ammunition for your gun.

Only BBs, pellets, cartridges or shells designed for a particular gun can be fired safely in that gun. Most guns have the ammunition type stamped on the barrel. Ammunition can be identified by information printed on the box and sometimes stamped on the cartridge. Do not shoot the gun unless you know you have the proper ammunition.Wear eye and ear protection as appropriate.

Guns are loud and the noise can cause hearing damage. They can also emit debris and hot gas that could cause eye injury. For these reasons, shooting glasses and hearing protectors should be worn by shooters and spectators.Never use alcohol or over-the-counter, prescription or other drugs before or while shooting.

Alcohol, as well as any other substance likely to impair normal mental or physical bodily functions, must not be used before or while handling or shooting guns.Store guns so they are not accessible to unauthorized persons.

Many factors must be considered when deciding where and how to store guns. A person’s particular situation will be a major part of the consideration. Dozens of gun storage devices, as well as locking devices that attach directly to the gun, are available. However, mechanical locking devices, like the mechanical safeties built into guns, can fail and should not be used as a substitute for safe gun handling and the observance of all gun safety rules.Be aware that certain types of guns and many shooting activities require additional safety precautions.
Cleaning

Regular cleaning is important in order for your gun to operate correctly and safely. Taking proper care of it will also maintain its value and extend its life. Your gun should be cleaned every time that it is used.A gun brought out of prolonged storage should also be cleaned before shooting. Accumulated moisture and dirt, or solidified grease and oil, can prevent the gun from operating properly.Before cleaning your gun, make absolutely sure that it is unloaded. The gun’s action should be open during the cleaning process. Also, be sure that no ammunition is present in the cleaning area.
More information visit:

http://training.nra.org/nra-gun-safety-rules.aspx

Bully Awareness

  
Defining Bullying:

Bullying is unwanted, aggressive behavior among school aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, and excluding someone from a group on purpose.
Stop Bullying on the Spot
When adults respond quickly and consistently to bullying behavior they send the message that it is not acceptable. Research shows this can stop bullying behavior over time. There are simple steps adults can take to stop bullying on the spot and keep kids safe.

  
Do:

Intervene immediately. It is ok to get another adult to help.
Separate the kids involved.

Make sure everyone is safe.

Meet any immediate medical or mental health needs.

Stay calm. Reassure the kids involved, including bystanders.

Model respectful behavior when you intervene.
Avoid these common mistakes:

Don’t ignore it. Don’t think kids can work it out without adult help.
Don’t immediately try to sort out the facts.

Don’t force other kids to say publicly what they saw.

Don’t question the children involved in front of other kids.

Don’t talk to the kids involved together, only separately.

Don’t make the kids involved apologize or patch up relations on the spot.


Get police help or medical attention immediately if:

A weapon is involved.

There are threats of serious physical injury.

There are threats of hate-motivated violence, such as racism or homophobia.

There is serious bodily harm.

There is sexual abuse.

Anyone is accused of an illegal act, such as robbery or extortion—using force to get money, property, or services.
For more information visit

stopbullying.gov

http://www.stopbullying.gov/what-is-bullying/index.html

Emergency Readiness

  
Are you prepared? Do you have the items in your home to combat any situation that may come your way? Do you have a plan for: winter storms, floods, tornados, power outages? 

In our society today we take the comforts of home and the ability to pickup food through a drive thru on our way home from our busy day. But do you have a plan in the event you and your family are snowed in or there is a extended power outage? 
Build a kit:

A disaster supplies kit is simply a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency.
Try to assemble your kit well in advance of an emergency. You may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you. You will probably not have time to search for the supplies you need or shop for them.
You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water and other supplies in sufficient quantity to last for at least 72 hours. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days.
Additionally, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment and telephones may be cut off for days or even a week, or longer. Your supplies kit should contain items to help you manage during these outages.

Basic Disaster Supplies Kit

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:
Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food

Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both

Flashlight and extra batteries

First aid kit

Whistle to signal for help

Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place

Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation

Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities

Manual can opener for food

Local maps

Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

  

For more information visit:

http://m.fema.gov/additional-emergency-supplies
For emergency updates in the local Gratis area and Preble County join Nixel @

http://www.nixle.com

Article credit FEMA.gov

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning 

  
What is Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon monoxide, or “CO,” is an odorless, colorless gas that can kill you.
  

Where is CO found?

CO is found in fumes produced any time you burn fuel in cars or trucks, small engines, stoves, lanterns, grills, fireplaces, gas ranges, or furnaces. CO can build up indoors and poison people and animals who breathe it.
What are the symptoms of CO poisoning?
The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain, and confusion. CO symptoms are often described as “flu-like.” If you breathe in a lot of CO it can make you pass out or kill you. People who are sleeping or drunk can die from CO poisoning before they have symptoms.
Who’s at risk from CO poisoning?

Everyone is at risk for CO poisoning. Infants, the elderly, people with chronic heart disease, anemia, or breathing problems are more likely to get sick from CO. Each year, more than 400 Americans die from unintentional CO poisoning not linked to fires, more than 20,000 visit the emergency room, and more than 4,000 are hospitalized.
How can I prevent CO poisoning in my home?

Install a battery-operated or battery back-up CO detector in your home and check or replace the battery when you change the time on your clocks each spring and fall.

Have your heating system, water heater, and any other gas, oil, or coal burning appliances serviced by a qualified technician every year.

Do not use portable flameless chemical heaters indoors.

If you smell an odor from your gas refrigerator have an expert service it. An odor from your gas refrigerator can mean it could be leaking CO.

When you buy gas equipment, buy only equipment carrying the seal of a national testing agency, such as Underwriters’ Laboratories.

Make sure your gas appliances are vented properly. Horizontal vent pipes for appliances, such as a water heater, should go up slightly as they go toward outdoors, as shown below. This prevents CO from leaking if the joints or pipes aren’t fitted tightly.

Have your chimney checked or cleaned every year. Chimneys can be blocked by debris. This can cause CO to build up inside your home or cabin.

Never patch a vent pipe with tape, gum, or something else. This kind of patch can make CO build up in your home, cabin, or camper.

Never use a gas range or oven for heating. Using a gas range or oven for heating can cause a build up of CO inside your home, cabin, or camper.

Never burn charcoal indoors. Burning charcoal – red, gray, black, or white – gives off CO.

Never use a portable gas camp stove indoors. Using a gas camp stove indoors can cause CO to build up inside your home, cabin, or camper.

Never use a generator inside your home, basement, or garage or less than 20 feet from any window, door, or vent.

  
More information:

Center of disease control

http://www.cdc.gov/co/faqs.htm

Vehicle Emergency Kit

  
Winter is just around the corner and that means holiday travel, traffic delays, chance of an accident or being stranded out in the elements are a greater risk. Here is a list of supplies recommended to carry in your vehicle to insure a safe return for you and your family.

Supplies for your kit:

Bag of abrasive material (sand, salt, cat litter) or traction mats

Snow shovel

Flashlight with extra batteries

Window washer solvent

Ice scraper with brush

Cloth or roll of paper towels

Jumper cables

Extra warm clothing (gloves, hats, scarves)

Blankets

Warning devices (flares or triangles)

Drinking water

Non-perishable snacks for both human and pet passengers

First-aid kit

Basic toolkit (screwdrivers, pliers, adjustable wrench)

Mobile phone and car charger pre-programmed with rescue apps and important phone numbers including family and emergency services.

In addition to preparing your emergency kit and knowing how to use every item in it, consider the following common-sense guidelines to protect yourself and your family when you are on the road.
Try to move your car completely off the road before taking any emergency measures.

Do not stand near the edge of the highway while you are checking your vehicle.

At night, turn on your flashers to signal that you need help.

In daylight, raise the hood and tie a white cloth on the antenna or door handle of your car.

Set out flares if you have them.

If you have to repair your car at night, wear a fluorescent safety vest.

While waiting for help to arrive, stay inside your car with the windows up and the doors locked.

Do not accept a ride to any destination from a passing motorist.

Traveling notify a friend or family member of where you are going, expected time of arrival and route you intend to take.
These tips will help to insure you and your family a safer trip.